Friday, June 14

The Crestone Eagle is a nonprofit monthly newspaper serving Crestone and the San Luis Valley

Indigenous Culture

Empowering the heirs to the Sangre de Cristo Land Grant

An interview with Move Mountains Project Executive Director, Shirley Romero Otero By Anna Lee Vargas. Since its official inception in 2014, Move Mountains Project (Move Mountains) has served as an art and entrepreneurship community education program that builds sustainable platforms for the youth leaders of San Luis, Colorado. Move Mountains’ mission is to encourage youth, as heirs to the Sangre de Cristo Land Grant, to develop deeper understandings of art, resource preservation and entrepreneurship in order to empower active community citizens through a focus on local and global social justice issues.  Since lack of employment is a major obstacle for youth of...

Embroidering the Story

A history of colcha in Saguache County By HEART of Saguache Colcha embroidery became an important cultural tradition in Saguache County when a revival took place in the 1970s to develop a cottage industry for low-income, rural women. Through a serpentine path of joy and disillusionment, participating artists and families came to treasure these artworks as heirlooms and expressions of community identity. Local landscapes are a common motif in SLV colcha embroidery as artists used their daily lives as inspiration. The programs didn’t result in economic prosperity and they became a touchstone in the complex history of the interplay between intentions and impacts...

The Acequia Institute

Protecting Indigenous foodways, feeding community, and empowering youth By Anya Kaats The Acequia Institute, located in San Luis, CO, has emerged as a beacon of community empowerment in the realm of agriculture and environmental justice. Among the Institute’s many endeavors is a 35-year-old seed sanctuary. The Acequia Institute’s founder, Devon Peña, has collected seeds over the years for the sanctuary — mainly corn, beans, and squash. These three foods are main agricultural crops for various Indigenous peoples in Central and North America and are often referred to by the Haudenosaunee (The Six Nations Iroquois Confederacy) as “The Three Sisters”.  The three crops...

The Indigenous role of fire

Using fire as a tool in land stewardship By Hillary Renick. Fire as a tool Fire, powerful and often feared, has been a fundamental part of the life of healthy forests throughout history.  Fire helps seeds germinate, aids in keeping meadows and grasslands balanced, and attracts healthy habitat for animals, insects and pollinators. Utilizing skills acquired by living in place for millennia and learning the rhythm of the seasons through observation, experimentation, and practice, Indigenous cultures use fire as a land management tool. By developing low-risk land management practices, Indigenous communities achieve the same effect as wildfire, but minimize the length of disruption...

IndigiNews: Decolonizing the media, elevating Indigenous voices

This year The Crestone Eagle will be taking notes from the all-Indigenous-led newsroom, IndigiNews. The Crestone Eagle is grateful to be mentoring under IndigiNews Publisher, Eden Fineday, who will offer DEI council to staff, provide cultural sensitivity readings of published content and deepen our capacity for meaningful, sensitive, and accurate coverage of Indigenous topics.  By Eden Fineday IndigiNews Publisher My name is Eden Fineday. I am a Cree woman (nehiyaw iskwew). I live above the imaginary line that was drawn across the continent back in 1846. I come from Treaty 6 Territory, which is an agreement made by my people and the...

SLV language: Rare 16th-century Spanish dialect spoken

By Anna Lee Vargas. Nestled between expansive mountain ranges and the Río Grande, the fertile lands of the San Luis Valley (SLV) have always been a point of contact between cultures and races.  The SLV represents a multicultural tapestry, including Native Americans, Hispanic, Mormon, Asian, and other rancher-settlers, while also encompassing the most extensive wetlands system in the Southern Rocky Mountains. This long and rich history dates back to the Paleo-Indians who lived here 13,000 years ago. Our people’s Indigenous, Spanish, and Mexican roots have played a major role in influencing our food, farming practices, religion, art, culture, and language.  For example,...

Soul Players of the Valley:“Semillas of Change” 

By Anna Lee Vargas. The Soul Players of the Valley (SPV) is a coalition of local Latino community leaders from four towns: Antonito, Capulin, San Luis, and South Alamosa. The Soul Players of the Valley came into existence because our communities made the choice to unite as one force for change. Having witnessed revitalization efforts fail in the past, we were determined to take a different approach.  Grounded in our traditional communal ways of life inherited from our Hispano ancestors, we lead our communities in identifying ways to address our needs and building on our strengths to ensure a vibrant and...

Culturally modified trees: Great Sand Dunes trees speak to the land’s rich Indigenous history

By Daniel Hart. While the Great Sand Dunes are probably most well known as a natural and geological wonder, the shifting folds of graceful sinuous sand conceal wonders of a whole different order. Where sand slowly yields to grass, grass to bushes, then bushes to ponderosa pine trees, those with a sharp eye may notice that some of the more venerable ponderosa pine trees along Medano Pass exhibit what look like ancient battle scars where bark has been torn from their core.  These scars are not from an odd lightning strike, trail blazes, or from wild game; they are a rare...

Embroidering the Story

A history of colcha in Saguache County By HEART of Saguache Colcha embroidery became an important...

The Acequia Institute

Protecting Indigenous foodways, feeding community, and empowering youth By Anya Kaats The Acequia Institute, located in...

The Indigenous role of fire

Using fire as a tool in land stewardship By Hillary Renick. Fire as a tool Fire, powerful and...

IndigiNews: Decolonizing the media, elevating Indigenous voices

This year The Crestone Eagle will be taking notes from the all-Indigenous-led newsroom, IndigiNews....

SLV language: Rare 16th-century Spanish dialect spoken

By Anna Lee Vargas. Nestled between expansive mountain ranges and the Río Grande, the fertile...

Soul Players of the Valley:“Semillas of Change” 

By Anna Lee Vargas. The Soul Players of the Valley (SPV) is a coalition of...

Culturally modified trees: Great Sand Dunes trees speak to the land’s rich Indigenous history

By Daniel Hart. While the Great Sand Dunes are probably most well known as a...

The sand that lives and breathes: The Great Sand Dunes is cultural property to 18 Native American tribes

By Daniel Hart. Between the bones of the Earth and the whimsy of the wind and...

The 2023 ring of fire solar eclipse: A novel spectacle for some, a sacred time for others

By Zaylah Pearson-Good. On October 14, 2023, millions gathered from across North, Central, and South...

Inaugural Powwow brings together tribes, community

Photography by Matt Lit. The inaugural San Luis Valley Intertribal Powwow brought Indigenous tribes and...

Land of Blue Water: A History of Saguache

By Mary Lowers. Saguache, the unique name few who are not from this area can...

World renowned mural artist transforms the Elephant Cloud

World renowned mural artist transforms the Elephant Cloud by Alma Carel As if overnight, a plain...
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